Dating my 1980 s ludwig drums

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The first two means of indication, date stamp and serial number/badge style, are the two most accurate for identifying the correct year of production.Throughout a drum’s life, it may be refinished, re-edged, and re-housed in hardware not from the drum’s era, but the date stamp and serial number will serve as a northern star to correct identification.A clear lacquer finish was used in 1960, 1968, 1969, and part of 1970.At that point, Ludwig introduced the Granitone finish, a gritty grey coating used to cover aesthetically displeasing blemishes in the interior wood finish.From autumn 1968 through 1975, Ludwig changed the mahogany plies over to maple, and in 1976 introduced the Classic series, abandoning the reinforcement rings and opting for six plies of maple and poplar.The Classic drums also opted back to the clear lacquer interior finish.If you happen to know your woods, examining the plies and interior finish can be instrumental in era identification, but again, the drum may have been modified through the years.

The fifty years from Ludwig’s inception in 1909 to the early 1960s deserves its own article, so in order to give you the most pertinent information for dating, we’ll be looking at drums from the early '60s onwards.Pointy badges - those with a pointed edge - are typically associated with models from the earlier '70s.After receiving a number of complaints that the badges catch on clothing and fabric, Ludwig began rounding off the edges, producing the “rounded” badge.The shells were complemented by a 1” reinforcement ring of maple.From 1961 until 1968 the interiors were painted white.

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