Xxx chornesky

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the immobility of eggs; and/or (2) the fact that sperm are generally more numerous than eggs.

Interestingly, Darwin evoked an energetic argument to explain what he termed “the greater general variability in the male sex”; “The female has to expend much organic matter in the formation of her ova, whereas the male expends much force in fierce contests with his rivals, in wandering about in search of the female, in exerting his voice, in pouring out odiferous secretions, &c. On the whole the expenditure of matter and force in the two sexes is probably nearly equal, though effected in very different ways and at different rates.” (Darwin 1871, p 219; see also discussion in Ghiselin 1987).

The arguments of Bill Eberhard (1996) and Patty Gowaty (2004) suggest that female control of fertilization may represent a form of mate choice.

At present, a popular hypothesis is that multiple factors may be at work to set the stage for sexual selection (see Shuster and Wade 2003).

The ultimate explanation for the rule of male-male competition and female choice was seen by Darwin as anisogamy.

In surprisingly modern arguments he traced the source of male eagerness and female coyness to (1) the motility of sperm vs.

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The great difficulty is to determine which differences between the sexes are causes of sexual selection and which are effects.Sexual selection has come to be seen as a keystone of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, being the exception that proves the rule that evolution proceeds through differential reproduction (see Ghiselin 1969b for discussion).Famously, Darwin developed the theory of sexual selection to account for certain traits such as the weapons used in male-male competition (for example, a stag's antlers) or the ornaments used to attract members of the opposite sex (for example, a peacock's tail) which seemed to be very important in obtaining mates but unimportant otherwise.Sexual selection is a term that has meant different things to different people.In a recent review, Tim Clutton-Brock (2004) listed 9 different definitions of sexual selection and the list is not exhaustive (see Table 1).

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